Living With Books 07: Reading Nooks for Children


This charming book house is in the Iowa Public Library (featured in Flavorwire's "10 Gorgeous Buildings Made Out of Books" by Emily Temple, Apr. 2012), but could be created in a children's room.

This charming book house is in the Iowa Public Library (featured in Flavorwire’s “10 Gorgeous Buildings Made Out of Books” by Emily Temple, Apr. 2012), but could be created in a children’s room.

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It’s January! Everyone is talking “new beginnings” — so what a perfect time for some fabulous children’s reading spaces in this month’s Living With Books!

For those of us who love books, reading is often a charmed and mystical memory from our childhood. We remember the first book we fell in love with, or a favorite place where we loved to read. It was a magical thing to get lost in the other world of a book.  In these pictures, designers, librarians and parents create that sense of fantasy in reading spaces for children.

Is this all just cutesy? Is it just over-the-top catalog art? 

Each month, I work with students on their independent reading goals and can say that, by sixth grade, at least a third of the kids come to me knowing how to read, but telling me they don’t like to read. This will be a challenge, as so much of their learning in the years ahead of them depends on reading. Plus, I can’t help feeling frustrated with them — as a child who doesn’t like reading most likely hasn’t hit on that one magical book, yet. On the other hand, I like to tell kids that famed YA writer Rick Riordan confesses he didn’t like reading until he was 13. For him, discovering mythology was transformative.

My oldest son now falls asleep reading every night — at 11, eager to dive back into the story he left off earlier in the day. But not long ago he hated reading — despised it, fought with tears running. Books were always present in our house, but buddy-reading through a couple great ones (Roland Smith’s Elephant Run was the first slam dunk!) communicated that reading was a shared hobby in the same way we might watch a movie together.

Fostering excitement about books and reading has the power to transform a reluctant reader. For those of us who grew up Living with Books, the presence of books in our homes taught us early to expect them to have value in our lives. The charming spaces pictured  convey that joy to children who are just discovering the magic.

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Idyllic tree-swing reading nook, created by Tracy Rauch in her daughter’s room; find at http://pinterest.com/tracyrauch/ A similar example is on JenWCom‘s flickr at http://www.flickr.com/photos/jenwcom/4914477695/in/pool-539895@N24/ Both moms have been gracious in answering questions in how they accomplished the look.Idyllic tree-swing reading nook, created by Tracy Rauch in her daughter's room. (http://pinterest.com/tracyrauch/) A similar example is on JenWCom's flickr at http://www.flickr.com/photos/jenwcom/4914477695/in/pool-539895@N24/.  Both moms have been gracious in answering questions in how they accomplished the look.
I first spotted this pic on the pinterest for NYC designers Bob & Cortney Novogratz, with an embedded photo credit to FunkyDowntown.com . The tree bookcase is actually made by Nurserworks, and is available in a darker green than pictured or white, for $850 from Layla Grace at http://www.laylagrayce.com/Products/Nurseryworks-Tree-Bookcase-Forest-Green__NW8126FG.aspx

I first spotted this pic on the pinterest for NYC designers Bob & Cortney Novogratz, with an embedded photo credit to FunkyDowntown.com . The tree bookcase is actually made by Nurseryworks, and is available in a darker green than pictured or white, for $850 from Layla Grace at http://www.laylagrayce.com/Products/Nurseryworks-Tree-Bookcase-Forest-Green__NW8126FG.aspx

This bedroom bookhut (or igloo) was designed by Ben Nagaoka. Topped with a roof of felted tiles, shelves of books form a cozy reading wall around a hidden bed. In a survey titled Hot or Not, Apartment Therapy features more pictures of the book igloo, inside and out.

This bedroom bookhut (or igloo) was designed by Ben Nagaoka. Topped with a roof of felted tiles, shelves of books form a cozy reading wall around a hidden bed. In a survey titled Hot or Not, Apartment Therapy features more pictures of the book igloo, inside and out.

Blogger Carolyn Chrisman shared this DIY project for painting rainbow bookshelves -- perfect for dressing up an ordinary bookcase for a child's playroom.

Blogger Carolyn Chrisman shared this DIY project for painting rainbow bookshelves — perfect for dressing up an ordinary bookcase for a child’s playroom.

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Of course, designing for children’s books need not be anything fancy nor anything permanent. Simply including shelves or baskets of books in a children’s space allows room for their reading interest to grow.

  • For young children or toddlers: baskets or buckets put picture books in easy reach. Favorite board books can be kept by the bed for nighttime reading. Try Goodnight Moon, Goodnight Gorilla, or my favorite: Corgiville Fair.
  • As children grow, share their old favorites. Make room for new reading by gifting their old books to last year’s preschool or kindergarten teacher, or younger cousins.
  • For upper elementary or middle grade students, encourage them to get “great read” recommendations from their friends. If they say, “There are no good reads,” then ask for recommendations from someone excited about middle grade novels, like their teacher, librarian or me!

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For more from my series Living with Books:

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1 Comment

Filed under Books, Living With Books, Writing Mother

One response to “Living With Books 07: Reading Nooks for Children

  1. OMG, those reading nooks are so cute. Our family is big on audiobooks, but I suppose one can listen to them in a nook as well, right? If anyone is interested, we download them for free at http://www.twirlygirlshop.com/stories-for-kids

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