Tag Archives: publish

Friday Links for Writers: Week’s Best Reads 01.06.17

Scrivener underway, nailing down the final novel structure. cElissa Field

Scrivener underway, nailing down the final novel structure. cElissa Field

One of my favorite things about the holidays is claiming long days to read and write. From Christmas Day to New Year’s, I’d read 4 novels, revised a short story, got a dozen story submissions out, and continued working through the editorial list for this novel.

So satisfying to progress through writing, revision and submission — although, it was humbling to realize you never outgrow the fidgety feeling submissions leave you with. No matter my years’ experience waiting for replies, I’ve been bad as a newbie, with that nagging obsession that I was waiting to hear back. The only cure: move on to other work.

As always, today’s Friday Links for Writers shares a list of some of the best writing links I’ve come across in recent weeks. Jane Friedman’s roundup shares 17 of her best shares, so bonus there. Share your thoughts in the comments, to let us know how your writing week has gone, or to share your own best reads of the week. Have a great writing week, all.

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How to Write a Great Story: A Roundup of the Best Advicegreat-story-roundup

This is far from the first time I’ve featured advice from Jane Friedman — I’m sure others will recognize her as a great source of insight into writing and publishing. Call this post from her blog “the motherlode,” as Jane shares 17 links to what she considers the best advice she has shared from authors, agents and publishers from 2011-2016.

The Big Reason Why Agents & Editors Often Stop Reading

This post by Paula Munier has been my favorite read from Jane’s roundup. Drawn from her book Writing with Quiet Hands, Munier asserts that a lack of narrative thrust is most often the culprit. I loved reading what she had to say about the story question, at macro-, meso- and micro- levels. I know I am not alone as a literary writer quietly craving more talk about plotting – this is that kind of piece.

Take Five: Donald Maass and the Emotional Craft of Fiction

In the same spirit as talk of narrative thrust, this post on Writer Unboxed interviews agent/author Donald Maass on his new release, The Emotional Craft of Fiction. While the post serves primarily to announce the new release, Don shares insights about authentic emotional engagement. Considering the canon of literary advice he has shared over the last decade and more, I appreciated how one of his answers traced the thread between his various books, which maps a growth in what continues to make novels “breakout,” including that crossroad between litfic and genre.

Emotion & Suspense: the Essence of Rasa Theory

71ythcjiyl__sx342_Continuing with the theme of creating an emotional experience, Rita Banerjee shares her essay on Rasa Theory: “Rasa theory centers on taste. Not taste in the sense of sophistication or composure or discernment…But taste in its most primal, animalistic, emotive, and provocative form…Rasa is what happens to you, spectator, reader, part-time lover, when you watch or read a work of art with intensity.I read the full article in my print copy of Poets & Writers Magazine (Jan/Feb 2017), but share here an excerpt that was posted by Cambridge Writer’s Workshop.

Submission Strategies: Advice from a Literary Magazine Editor

Aerogramme shared this roundup of advice from editor Kim Winternheimer of the Masters Review. I like that her advice asks, what kind of writer are you?, in acknowledging that her advice may lead to different answers for different writers, with some tips on how to make those choices.

The Best Independent Bookstores in America

parnassus“Independent bookstores are not only surviving but thriving,” Allison McNearney reports in the Daily Beast. She shares her list of the best of the indies, including a few of my favorites: Powell’s Books in Portland, Parnassus Books in Nashville, and Books & Books in Miami. (If you’re looking to find an independent bookseller near you, check my indie bookseller list on Twitter or indiebound.org.)

2017 Resistance Actions – Week One

Okay, so this may seem an odd link in a roundup of writing advice, yet it is at the heart of the context many of us are operating in this year. Whether you engage in the Resistance, feel threatened by recent politics, or are otherwise engaging in activism, or if you are writing about it, Maud Newton’s plan for one week of daily acts is a concrete map of how many are standing up for right action in 2016-17.

Toni Morrison on the Power of Language: Her Nobel Acceptance Speech

Beautiful picture of Toni Morrison on a wall inside the Lillian Vernon Writers' House at NYU. I first knew I wanted to write fiction, hearing Toni Morrison read Sula. Love.

Beautiful picture of Toni Morrison on a wall inside the Lillian Vernon Writers’ House at NYU.

People sometimes ask, “What was the first book you read that inspired you to be a writer?” Mine was Toni Morrison, first Song of Solomon, and then Sula. I signed out a library room at VCU and listened alone to a recording of her reading Sula’s final scene. The wrenching inspiration I took then is repeated in the effect of her Nobel Acceptance speech, shared here by BrainPickings.

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What Are You Working On?

What is your current writing goal? What resources or strategies have kept you moving forward? Share your thoughts or links you’ve found helpful in the comments.

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Friday Links for Writers 07.25.14

word hoard postAnyone working on revision to a novel right now might relate to the kind of weeks I’ve had recently, when my mantra seems to be “less talk, more do.” There comes a point in editing when you don’t want to talk about it, you just want to get it done.

So I’ll offer few words of greeting, but simply get this posted.

I hope you’ll enjoy this week’s Friday Links for Writers — which range from writers sharing concrete steps of their process or advice on dialogue, to a checklist for reviewing female characters, to a podcast from the NEA. As always, let me know what resounds with you, what you wish you could find more information about, or share your own links in the comments. Have a great writing week!

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Is Your Dialogue Just Characters Talking?

Thanks to Roz Morris for sharing this great article by Monica Clark, which shares powerful advice on writing dialogue as inspired by author Walter Mosley. (Those 3 names in one sentence reveals how much we all trade and share together, doesn’t it? I love that about writers.) Monica points out the weight well-written or poorly-written dialogue can have in a reader (or agent’s) first glance at your book, while Walter lists the multiple tasks any line of dialogue should accomplish. (Want more on dialogue? Check the first link in Friday Links for Writers 7.11.14)

Embracing the Process

This is a guest post by Linda Mullaly Hunt as part of the month-long Teachers Write program. Those of you who love reading about another writer’s process — especially those who do not use Scrivener* — may really like the way she uses coded cards to organize and edit her novel as it goes through revisions. (*Linda’s method can be done digitally using features in Scrivener.)

An Unseemly Emotion: PW Talks with Claire Messud

Last year, I wrote a post about the need to let characters misbehave (Writing Character: Say the Things We Never Say). In that spirit, I loved this conversation with Claire Messud, via Publishers Weekly, summed up with this quote: “As a writer, I subscribe to Chekhov’s world view: ‘It’s not my job to tell you that horse thieves are bad people. It’s my job to tell you what this horse thief is like.'”

6 Things Not to Expect from a Literary Agent

Whether you are wondering about connections with your new agent or still in the aspiring phase, wondering what an agent will do for you, I liked this frank list of realistic expectations from Carly Watters at The Write Life.

8-Point Checklist for Writing Better Women Characters

A couple Friday Links back (6.20.14), I shared Tasha Robinson’s interesting discussion of ‘trinity syndrome,’ suggesting that there is an inherent weakness being written into supposedly strong female characters, particularly in film. Today’s link, on the screenwriting site Black Board, turns that lengthy article into 8 checkpoints to assess whether you’ve undermined your female lead. Not a bad tool for rethinking any female characters.

Julie Otsuka on Artworks

Need a good listen? Find inspiration from Julie Otsuka as she speaks on the National Endowment for the Arts’ podcast, Artworks, about the inspiration for her novel. It’s interesting to hear about her choice in leaving characters unnamed, as she wrote about the isolation caused by Japanese interment. (Or, read the transcript which will be posted soon)

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How is Your Writing Week?

I’ve been sharing here and on Twitter (#SumNovRev) my summer goal of finishing novel revisions. What are your current writing goals? What are your biggest hurdles (mine this week included a 20-hr vacation drive that left me with a crushed monitor on my laptop… ugh!)? What strategies help you get it done? Share your questions, thoughts or links in the comments below!

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No so much a selfie as sign of how bad the glare on the laptop screen can be. c Elissa Field

No so much a selfie as sign of how bad the glare on the laptop screen can be. c Elissa Field

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