Tag Archives: Roz Morris

Friday Links for Writers 06.13.14

Benefit of learning to write on the go: my "office" view for the afternoon.

Benefit of learning to write on the go: my “office” view for the afternoon. c. Elissa Field

If you’ve caught the pictures I’ve shared on Twitter or even the headers to my last two posts, you’ll get that we are in full-on summer status, here. Pool, beach, morning mimosas… Sweet!

Yeah, not so easy: for me, summer is all about long days of writing and revision, so those same pictures are attached to posts about the tough job of finishing this novel. I may be lounging, but the laptop and print novel draft are open in my lap. If you’re in that same status, I’ve been using the hashtag #SumNovRev to connect with others working on finalizing a novel over the next couple months — sharing goals, milestones and resources to keep us going.

Which brings us to today’s Friday Links for Writers, which shares some of the best recent-reads on mastering novel revision, from sentence-level to the first chapter to knowing when you’re done. As always, feel free to share in the comments about what resounds with you, what you’d like to read more of, or share your own best links of the week.

*     *     *     *     *

Nail Your Novel’s First Chapter

Sometimes I feel like all the writing advice out there focuses on the first chapter — but of course this makes sense, since so much is riding on whether or not those first pages hook a reader, agent or editor. Which is exactly the point made in this short post by novel editor Ellen Brock.

Point of View Shifts and Head-hopping: Always Bad?

On Saturday, in my review of Anthony Marra’s A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, I admired Anthony’s control in navigating pov shifts. Here, this post from Roz Morris is a great examination of the how’s and why’s of what makes head-hopping risky.

The Sentence is a Lonely Place

Shared on the Believer website, this is a transcript of a lecture by Gary Lutz to writing students at Columbia University.  I first discovered this piece a year or so ago, as a link at the end of author Matt Bell’s “The Books We Teach” (behind the subscriber wall at Ploughshares).

11 Questions to Ask Yourself When You Reach the End

This article by Kathy Crowley at Beyond the Margins is a great list of questions to consider when you reach the end of a draft stage. As Kathy puts it, review this list without too much intensity, just making notes, before setting the work aside to hibernate. It includes great challenges regarding everything from character to setting to plot. A useful tool.

Book Launch Checklist

For those with a book done, in the querying process or even waiting for an impending release, this post at Kelsye Nelson’s site is the most comprehensive check list I’ve seen for launching a book — and was one of the most retweeted links I shared on Twitter this week.

Novelists Discuss the Magic in the Creative Process

I like to end Friday Links with inspirational interviews or lectures, and I really liked this one: from Aspen Institute’s Winter Words 2014, Authors Karen Jay Fowler and Carole DeSanti discuss the creative process.

*     *     *     *     *

How About You?

Feel free to share your favorite links (even your own) in the comments below.

*     *     *     *     *

If you like this blog, be sure to subscribe using WordPress’s +follow option, or via email or the Bloglovin button in the sidebar. I love to connect with like-minded readers and writers!

More on this site:

(c. Elissa Field, no repro w-out written permission)

 

Advertisements

4 Comments

Filed under Friday Links

Friday Links for Writers 01.17.14

c. Elissa Field

c. Elissa Field

As friends around the internet work on finishing a novel or preparing for a book release or jumpstarting a new business endeavor or achieving myriad other goals, lots of us are finding information or inspiration in our weekly reading.  That’s true of the articles shared in this week’s Friday Links for Writers — from an interview with George Saunders to  query advice, these were articles to spark thinking.  I hope you find them useful.

As always, let me know what resonates for you in these links, what you’d like more of, or share your own favorite reads from the week in the comments. Best wishes for a great writing (and reading) week!

*     *     *     *     *

The Truth About What Really Matters in a Simple Way

Writer George Saunders seems to earn nothing but praise and accolades — from bestsellers to nods from Guggenheim, MacArthur, Time and the Wall Street Journal, to Best American Short Stories. That was enough to motivate me to add his  Tenth of December: Stories to my Winter Reading List. I enjoyed reading his insights in this interview at Salon.

Why Your Editor Admires You (and Why You Might Not Realize This)

I love this open letter from Roz Morris (a writer, editor and bestselling ghostwriter) which is great inspiration to any hard-working writer, as she puts into words all the work that goes into getting a novel to a polished form.

Query Letter Pet Peeves

In this post, Chuck Sambuchino shares replies from 11 literary agents with the biggest errors they wish writers would avoid in query letters. If you’re a submission pro, this will repeat some advice, but each agent’s comment includes a link to more advice from that agent.

What Do You Want From Your Writing?

A guest post from author Dan Holloway on Jane Friedman’s blog, this post challenges writers to take the time to put into words exactly what they want from their writing.  His guidance makes this more than just vague inspiration, but an interesting introspection.

What Are Grown-Ups Afraid of in YA Books?

For my friends who read, write or market young adult fiction (or are parents or educators of readers), this article on Book Riot presents head-on the controversy that occasionally arises over some YA themes. (As an educator and parent, I have more mixed perspectives: I do think YA authors have more of a responsibility to write what is healthy for a reader, not just what will sell — and that can be hard to restrain with the pressure to get attention in a competitive market.)

*     *     *     *     *

What About You?

What has been meaningful to you in your reading this week? Or what kind of information do you need to reach current goals?  Share your own links of comments below.

*     *     *     *     *

If you like this blog, be sure to subscribe using WordPress’s +follow option, the Bloglovin’ button or via email.  I love to connect with like-minded readers and writers!

Recent Posts:

Popular Reads this Week:

Leave a comment

Filed under Friday Links